Marla Durben Hirsch

Biography for Marla Durben Hirsch

Marla Durben Hirsch is an attorney who has specialized in health law for 28 years and has written about the many facets of healthcare for almost 15 years. She also is the editor for several other books, journals and publications, including the HIPAA Answer Book and The Health Lawyer, the flagship magazine of the American Bar Association’s Health Law Section. She has won a number of awards for her coverage of healthcare news, and has been quoted in several publications, including the New York Times. She can be reached at mdhirsch@fiercemarkets.com. Follow @FierceHealthIT on Twitter, or find her on LinkedIn.

Articles by Marla Durben Hirsch

EHRs in NICUs could be refined to provide most relevant info

Electronic health records in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) could be modified to synthesize the vast amounts of data available to assist in clinical decision making and offer variations based on clinician role, according to a new study in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making

Could AMA's increased pitch to feds on Meaningful Use backfire?

I think it's fair to say that for the American Medical Association (AMA), the gloves officially are off.

EHRs can 'significantly' improve the quality of clinical notes

Electronic health records can improve the quality of physicians' clinical notes, according to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Researchers: Both human error, EHR inadequacies led to Ebola misdiagnosis

A combination of human errors and electronic health record usability issues caused the misdiagnosis of the first Ebola patient in the United States, according to a new article in the online journal Diagnosis.

Study: EHR users incur greater administrative burden

Electronic health records increase physicians' administrative burdens rather than decrease them as expected, according to an article in the International Journal of Health Services.

AMA to CMS: 'Tsunami of rules' overwhelms doctors, hurts patients

The American Medical Association is doing its utmost to light a fire under the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, this time warning CMS about the impending "tsunami of rules and policies" that threaten both physicians and patients.

New HHS initiative places heavy emphasis on EHR use

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services continues to employ the strategy of encouraging the adoption of electronic health records without relying on the Meaningful Use program, this time by putting major emphasis on EHRs and interoperability into its new Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative.

How long must providers wait for better EHRs?

David Blumenthal, former National Coordinator for Health IT and current president of the Commonwealth Fund, published a very insightful and thought provoking blog post last week about the fact that electronic health records are now the industry's "understandable but not wholly justifiable" scapegoat for many of the problems in healthcare. Among other things, he pointed to the human tendency to want to cast blame rather than take responsibility for mistakes, the fact that EHRs are "imperfect" systems, and that they're at the forefront of clinicians' minds, literally "in their faces" all day long. 

But there is one item in his article with which I don't agree.

 

EHRs help detect patients at risk of venous thromboembolisms

Electronic health records can help identify patients with pulmonary embolisms and deep vein thrombosis with "high accuracy" according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Survey: Mobile device access to EHRs boosts doc satisfaction

A majority of physicians are still struggling with interoperability, but mobile device users were happier overall with their systems, according to Software Advice's latest annual electronic health record UserView survey.