Marla Durben Hirsch

Biography for Marla Durben Hirsch

Marla Durben Hirsch is an attorney who has specialized in health law for 28 years and has written about the many facets of healthcare for almost 15 years. She also is the editor for several other books, journals and publications, including the HIPAA Answer Book and The Health Lawyer, the flagship magazine of the American Bar Association’s Health Law Section. She has won a number of awards for her coverage of healthcare news, and has been quoted in several publications, including the New York Times. She can be reached at mdhirsch@fiercemarkets.com. Follow @FierceHealthIT on Twitter, or find her on LinkedIn.

Articles by Marla Durben Hirsch

EHRs have turned a corner

The jury may still be out on how the Meaningful Use program should operate and whether it really improves quality. There's no question, however, that the program was the catalyst for massive, high-speed adoption of electronic health records--and that the industry may have just turned a corner in its use and attitude regarding such systems.

Top 25 MU attesters earned $171 million in 2012

The 25 doctors who attested to Meaningful Use in 2012 and received the most Medicare reimbursements were paid a total of $171 million, according to a personal blog post from Steven Posnack (pictured), director of federal policy division at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT.

KLAS: EMRs don't yet meet ACO needs

Electronic medical records are not meeting the needs of physician-led accountable care organizations, causing providers to turn to third party ACO vendors to meet their needs, according to a new report from Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research.

CMS issues MU attestation guidance for providers in group/health system settings

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has issued guidance to help eligible hospitals and eligible professionals who are part of larger entities or who practice in multiple locations and participate in the Meaningful Use program.

Study: Meaningful Use not necessarily associated with quality improvement

Although one of the main goals of the Meaningful Use program is to improve the quality of care, there appears to be "no association" between being a "meaningful user" of electronic health records and the quality of care provided to patients, according to a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The vision of HIE: 'Knowledge is power'

Health Information exchanges have encountered a few road bumps, but the industry is making progress in using HIE to "harness" information and communication to improve patient care, accosting to Robyn Rontal, MHSA, JD, Director of HCV Data Analytics for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan.

4 lesser known problems with EHRs

Although the healthcare industry continues to transition from paper to electronic health records, many patients and even some providers remain unaware of their imperfections.

Beware the hidden costs of a poorly constructed EHR contract

We know that electronic health records can cost a lot of money, sometimes millions of dollars. So it would be pretty disconcerting for a provider to learn that it has to pay additional amounts on top of that initial layout. Yet evidently, this is not uncommon, and it's often because providers make mistakes when entering into a contract with an EHR vendor. 

Black Book Rankings: Primary-care docs happier with their EHRs

Primary-care physicians are happier with their EHRs than they used to be, according to Black Book Rankings' annual report on ambulatory EHR users.

BIDMC expands e-access to mental health notes

Boston-based Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a pioneer in providing patients with access to their electronic health record data, has decided to take its policy on transparency a step further by allowing patients to access mental health notes.