Marla Durben Hirsch

Biography for Marla Durben Hirsch

Marla Durben Hirsch is an attorney who has specialized in health law for 28 years and has written about the many facets of healthcare for almost 15 years. She also is the editor for several other books, journals and publications, including the HIPAA Answer Book and The Health Lawyer, the flagship magazine of the American Bar Association’s Health Law Section. She has won a number of awards for her coverage of healthcare news, and has been quoted in several publications, including the New York Times. She can be reached at mdhirsch@fiercemarkets.com. Follow @FierceHealthIT on Twitter, or find her on LinkedIn.

Articles by Marla Durben Hirsch

It's time to plot the future of EHRs

My commentary last week stating that electronic health records have turned a corner seemed to have struck a nerve--or at least more than the usual amount of interest. The article has been one of the most read and shared editorials I've written. It's also been mentioned in tweets and retweeted more than usual, especially the line "the time has come for people to stop complaining about EHRs and focus on their future." So what should we focus on?

VA: More education needed on Blue Button initiative

Only one-third of veterans are taking advantage of "Blue Button" capabilities to access the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' personal health record portal, My HealtheVet, but those who do so are pleased with it, according to a study published recently in the Journal of the American Informatics Association.

House committee withholds funds to VA, DoD to spur EHR collaboration

The House Appropriations Committee has opted to withhold most of the funds requested by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to upgrade its electronic health record system until the VA and the Department of Defense make progress on a joint EHR.

Demand for EHR scribes on the rise

The use of scribes to help physicians document notes into electronic health records continues to gain traction, creating a boon for scribe staffing companies.

HIE tool reduces duplicative tests, IDs drug seekers

Health information exchange tools can fill in gaps in patient care and reduce unnecessary tests in hospital emergency departments, according to new research published in the journal Applied Clinical Informatics.

Attorneys: Use strategies to reduce EHR documentation errors

Providers must take steps to reduce the risk of improper billing caused by their use of electronic health record functionalities that help with documentation, according to a recently published attorney advisory.

EHRs have turned a corner

The jury may still be out on how the Meaningful Use program should operate and whether it really improves quality. There's no question, however, that the program was the catalyst for massive, high-speed adoption of electronic health records--and that the industry may have just turned a corner in its use and attitude regarding such systems.

Top 25 MU attesters earned $171 million in 2012

The 25 doctors who attested to Meaningful Use in 2012 and received the most Medicare reimbursements were paid a total of $171 million, according to a personal blog post from Steven Posnack (pictured), director of federal policy division at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT.

KLAS: EMRs don't yet meet ACO needs

Electronic medical records are not meeting the needs of physician-led accountable care organizations, causing providers to turn to third party ACO vendors to meet their needs, according to a new report from Orem, Utah-based KLAS Research.

CMS issues MU attestation guidance for providers in group/health system settings

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has issued guidance to help eligible hospitals and eligible professionals who are part of larger entities or who practice in multiple locations and participate in the Meaningful Use program.